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During School Board Recognition Month this October, we would like to thank the members of the Herkimer BOCES Board of Education for their service and all that they do for BOCES and our students! Thank you to: Daniel LaLonde, Thomas Shypski, Jack Bono, Ronald Loiacono, Janine Lynch, William Miller, James Schmid, Michelle Szarek, Linda Tharp and Daniel Voce!
Herkimer BOCES conservation students showcase projects
with management plans to help animal species

July 3, 2017




Conservation students pose with their projects
Herkimer-Fulton-Hamilton-Otsego BOCES conservation students presented their projects during a showcase on June 8 at Herkimer BOCES. Senior students are pictured here, from left, front row: Mikayla Vickerson, of Richfield Springs; Kyle Kovac, of Herkimer; Allie Steffen, of Central Valley; Christian Brashear, of Richfield Springs; Collin Treen, of Herkimer, and conservation instructor Will Carpenter. Back row: Hunter Eckler, of Central Valley, and Dillon Holmes, of Herkimer.



HERKIMER – Herkimer-Fulton-Hamilton-Otsego BOCES conservation student Allie Steffen, a senior of Central Valley Academy, welcomed the recent showcase for conservation projects at Herkimer BOCES because she had already been talking to everyone she knows about what she learned about the San Joaquin kit fox.

“I like presenting. I like doing this,” she said. “You’ve worked on this for so long, you want to talk to someone new about it. Everyone around me is pretty much an expert on a kit fox now.”

Students in the Herkimer BOCES conservation program did a capstone project for the end of the school year involving a 10-page paper, creating a display and presenting to guests during the conservation capstone project showcase on June 8 at Herkimer BOCES.

Because the public speaking portion of the project involves talking to visitors to the showcase about the project, the students have to do more than memorize and recite information about their topic, conservation instructor William Carpenter said.

“They have to know it enough to answer questions about it,” he said.

The students each chose a species with conservation needs such as being endangered, threatened or otherwise of interest. Then the students did research and developed management plans for helping the species that could potentially be implemented.

“That’s the kind of thing that can make an impact,” Carpenter said.

Many students chose species that are local to this area – not just bears and moose, but animals such as salamanders – showing that they’re legitimately interested in conserving the environment as a whole, he said.

“They wanted to affect the places where they live and where they’re at,” he said.

Steffen was an exception, choosing the San Joaquin kit fox because it’s endangered and because it’s from central California, where she has relatives. Her management plan dealt with pesticides and finding a balance between agriculture needs and the need to protect the animals.

“It took a lot of work,” she said.

Conservation senior Hunter Eckler, of Central Valley, chose grey wolves for his project.

“I just love grey wolves,” he said. “I actually enjoyed researching it.”

Eckler said he learned more than what he already knew about grey wolves. For example, he knew they were endangered, but he  didn’t know they were endangered to the point that there are only about 200 of them in the Adirondacks now, as opposed to about 2,000 of them there in the 1800s.

His management plan dealt with helping the population through examining the habitat, food in the area and poachers.

The project showcase is nice because people get to actually see your work, and you can answer questions about it, Eckler said.

“It will give them a little bit more knowledge on the species,” he said.

The experience definitely helps with public speaking, he said.

“It’s beneficial,” he said. “It makes you a more well-rounded person. It’s just another skill. It’s a good skill to have to talk to people.”




Conservation student poses with her project
Herkimer-Fulton-Hamilton-Otsego BOCES conservation senior Allie Steffen, of Central Valley, poses with her display on the San Joaquin kit fox during the conservation project showcase on June 8 at Herkimer BOCES.



Conservation student poses with his project
Herkimer-Fulton-Hamilton-Otsego BOCES conservation senior Hunter Eckler, of Central Valley, poses with his display on grey wolves during the conservation project showcase on June 8 at Herkimer BOCES.








 
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