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Herkimer BOCES Automotive Technology students going ‘above and beyond’ with industry-recognized certifications

June 7, 2019




Five students pose holding their automotive technology certificates by a black truck


Some of the Herkimer-Fulton-Hamilton-Otsego BOCES Automotive Technology seniors who received certifications in at least one National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence areas are pictured here, from left: Joel McKinney-Wellenstein, of Central Valley; Seth Arsenault, of West Canada Valley; Brady Williams, of Dolgeville; Steven Harper, of Little Falls, and Peyton Walker, of Frankfort-Schuyler. Four other seniors received at least one ASE certification, but aren’t pictured because they were participating in work study experiences: Adam Crowley, of Mount Markham; Brighton Collver, of Frankfort-Schuyler; Thomas Coffin, of Mount Markham, and Raheem Alkabi, of Frankfort-Schuyler. The majority of the students received five or more certifications, and some achieved as many as 10.





HERKIMER – Numerous students in the Herkimer-Fulton-Hamilton-Otsego BOCES Automotive Technology program received National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence certifications this school year that could help lead to job opportunities and higher salaries in the future.

Students learn about three ASE certification areas as juniors and two more as seniors. They also have access through the class to use CDX Learning Systems to study for additional certifications online – up to a total of 10 areas of certification.

“Many students in the class far exceeded the five certifications I teach in class,” Herkimer BOCES Automotive Technology instructor Craig Miller said. “Students went above and beyond.”

Juniors in the Herkimer BOCES Automotive Technology program are taught about certification for brakes, suspension and steering and light maintenance and repair. Seniors then learn about electrical and engine performance.

The daily Automotive Technology class usually includes 45 minutes of instruction followed by an hour and 45 minutes practicing in the large automotive lab doing hands-on mockup jobs or live work on automobiles that people need repaired.

ASE certifications look good to employers and State University of New York colleges with programs in the automotive field, Miller said.

“They’re recognized out in dealerships and the industry,” he said, of the certifications. “Employers look for that.”

Earning ASE certifications on the educational level also prepares students for the industry-level certification tests, which can be taken after one year of working in the field, Miller said. The certification tests students take through the class are essentially the same level of challenge as the industry tests, he said.

“It’s a difficult test,” he said.

Salaries for automotive technicians is often based on how many ASE certifications they have, and an ASE-certified master technician on the industry level can start at about $25 per hour, Miller said.

Students can also earn a technical endorsement on their high-school diplomas if they receive certification in at least one ASE area, do an exit-out project, participate in an internship, pass both a theoretical and practical exam and complete work-based learning hours.

 “The majority of my class is five-area certified and above,” Miller said. “Some of them have achieved master certification.

One of them is senior Brady Williams, of Dolgeville, who took and passed the tests for all 10 certification areas.

“Just because I saw them on there, so I took them,” he said.

Learning about the certification areas and taking the tests could lead to more opportunities after high school and benefit students when it comes to doing practical work, Williams said.

“It does help with working on cars because you get the knowledge of doing it before you actually do it,” he said.

The following Automotive Technology students received ASE certification in at least one area this school year:

Seniors:

  • Raheem Alkabi, of Frankfort-Schuyler;

  • Seth Arsenault, of West Canada Valley;

  • Thomas Coffin, of Mount Markham;

  • Brighton Collver, of Frankfort-Schuyler;

  • Adam Crowley, of Mount Markham;

  • Steven Harper, of Little Falls;

  • Joel McKinney-Wellenstein, of Central Valley;

  • Peyton Walker, of Frankfort-Schuyler, and

  • Brady Williams, of Dolgeville.

Juniors:

  • Leland Brado, of Central Valley;

  • Raymond Bronson, of Poland;

  • Dylan Coleman, of Poland;

  • David Everson, of Central Valley;

  • Alexandra Goff, of Dolgeville;

  • Ryan Hoskey, of West Canada Valley;

  • Brandon Miles, of Frankfort-Schuyler;

  • Nicholas Parrotta, of Frankfort-Schuyler;

  • Andrew Perry, of Central Valley;

  • Zach Seamon, of Richfield-Springs;

  • David Silchuk, of Frankfort-Schuyler;

  • Michael Spratley, of Frankfort-Schuyler;

  • Austin Stone, of Herkimer, and

  • Jayde Travis, of Frankfort-Schuyler.

Adult student:

  • Brian Federico.



14 students pose holding their automotive technology certificates by a black truck


Herkimer-Fulton-Hamilton-Otsego BOCES Automotive Technology juniors who received certifications in at least one National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence areas are pictured here, from left: Alexandra Goff, of Dolgeville; Zach Seamon, of Richfield-Springs; Jayde Travis, of Frankfort-Schuyler; Leland Brado, of Central Valley; Ryan Hoskey, of West Canada Valley; Austin Stone, of Herkimer; David Everson, of Central Valley; David Silchuk, of Frankfort-Schuyler, and Raymond Bronson, of Poland. Second row: Andrew Perry, of Central Valley; Brandon Miles, of Frankfort-Schuyler; Michael Spratley, of Frankfort-Schuyler, and Dylan Coleman, of Poland. In back: Nicholas Parrotta, of Frankfort-Schuyler. Also receiving certifications was adult student Brian Federico, not pictured.